175 December, 2011

perm_identity From the Editor

Gimme a Word

Issue No. 175 ~ December, 2011

My demons could never be exorcized through playing characters, I was stuck with trying to understand myself and what I perceived as the uncomprehending world around me through other means. Pretense was anathema to me, and yet, acting fascinated both my father and Ferruccio; my father through utilizing videotape in therapy and Ferruccio through staging psychodramas, encouraging patients to perform in spontaneous scenarios.

local_library Poetry

pages Micro-Fiction

Middling

Issue No. 175 ~ December, 2011

“Who’s ready for dessert?” she calls as she barges through the saloon doors with five glasses on a tray, oblivious to the scarlet flush that tips her daughter’s ears.

portrait One on One

Jacqueline Bishop

Issue No. 175 ~ December, 2011

Jacqueline Bishop was born and raised in Kingston, Jamaica, before coming to the United States to attend college. She is the author of two poetry collections, Snapshots From Istanbul and Fauna, as well as a novel, The River's Song. Bishop is also the author of the non-fiction books, My Mother Who Is Me: Life Stories From Jamaican Women in New York, and Writers Who Paint/Painters Who Write: Three Jamaican Artists.

person_pin Essay

Pensive Pondering About Childhood Past

Issue No. 175 ~ December, 2011

I’ve always had trouble accepting the intricacies of the so-called grown up world, finding the behavior of most adults completely bewildering. This started in childhood with the way I viewed my father. I thought he …

map Macro-Fiction

Don’t Tell Me Why

Issue No. 175 ~ December, 2011

When we finish, I see he has the gun, so I can’t do anything, like get away, which was what I was hoping for, and he ties me up again. Afterwards, because it’s drier down there, he slides back underneath the platform.

They Live on the Water

Issue No. 175 ~ December, 2011

“I’m going back out to look for her,” Elena said. He looked up from his desk and saw her backlit in the doorway of his office. “You want to come with me?”

National Cake

Issue No. 175 ~ December, 2011

My mother had said we should be careful how we moved about in Ama, because the bad men were on rampage. Every mother sang it like a song to their children.