portrait One on One Archives

Richard Goodman

Issue No. 131 ~ April, 2008

"People I respect very much have liked the book. I sent two chapters to M.F.K. Fisher before she died, and she wrote me back a marvelous letter telling me she liked the writing very much. She said that she didn't like 99% of what had been written about Provence...'But Richard, you have broken the spell'."

David Amram

Issue No. 128 ~ January, 2008

"There's always been a natural relationship, even as a teenager wanting to be a composer, and playing at amateur symphonies, and later at professional symphonies and also playing jazz and accompanying singers, I always realized the words and the music were part of the whole."

D. Harlan Wilson

Issue No. 128 ~ January, 2008

"I was a pretty imaginative kid. But not Bizarro-inclined, per se. My life revolved around collecting and playing with Star Wars, G.I. Joe and Masters of the Universe action figures and vehicles...Mostly, though, I liked to draw... My illustrations were ok, good for my age, but not great, and I was always better at mimicking somebody else's artwork than conceiving of and creating my own."

Danika Dinsmore

Issue No. 126 ~ November, 2007

"The 3:15 Experiment is another organized "event" that I'm sure I will continue to do for the rest of my life...Since 1993, a shifting menagerie of poets has woken up at 3:15 AM each morning during the month of August to write...Right now, it's where the bulk of my poetry comes from because I don't write much poetry these days."

Robert Dana

Issue No. 122 ~ July, 2007

"Jobs were terribly scarce in the mid-1950's. There were, with the exception of Stanford, no other writing programs out there. Teaching what is now called Creative Writing wasn't an option. And many of the academic teaching jobs had already been snapped up by the preceding generation of GI Bill people with graduate degrees."

Peter Selgin

Issue No. 116 ~ January, 2007

"...I like to draw; I was good at it. I had a prodigious grasp of perspective that let me render things photographically with devilish ease. I was like those autistic wunderkinds ... Only I wasn't autistic..."

Claire Davis

Issue No. 116 ~ January, 2007

"I started writing stories at about eight or nine years of age, as soon as I could reasonably put pen to paper. I'd be frustrated that books I read would end, so I'd pick up and write new endings, or sequels..."

Claire Davis interview

Issue No. 116 ~ January, 2007

"I started writing stories at about eight or nine years of age, as soon as I could reasonably put pen to paper. I'd be frustrated that books I read would end, so I'd pick up and write new endings, or sequels. When I was nine, I read Jack London and realized that that was what I wanted to do with my life. No. More than that, I believed I could do it. And so I was soon making up my own adventures on the page. Of course, looking back, the whole thing seems absolutely improbable, and I can't help but wonder what it is in us that defies commonsense and says, instead, 'You can do this'."

Richard Beban

Issue No. 109 ~ June, 2006

"I believe that poets have always been shamans, griots, storytellers, seers, sorceresses, since long before writing, and that it's our duty to continue that tradition, no matter what culture we find ourselves born into. If we have been born with the gift, it is our responsibility to use it for the benefit of the tribe speaking truth to power, turning our visions into art to the best of our abilities."

Gladys Swan

Issue No. 106 ~ March, 2006

"Like many kids I tried writing little poems and stuff, but it was my eighth grade spelling teacher who sent me on my way. She assigned us the task of making a story out of the week's spelling words and then read mine to the class. After that, I knew I wanted to be a writer."